Accessibility View Close toolbar
  • Vitrectomy and Vitreoretinal Eye Surgery

    Vitreoretinal surgery refers to a group of surgeries which take place inside the eye's interior where the vitreous (gel-like material) and retina (photosensitive membrane) are located. Vitreoretinal procedures are either performed with traditional surgical tools or lasers, and address a range of ophthalmic

    Read more
  • What Is Astigmatism?

    Astigmatism is an extremely common eye condition that affects both children and adults. It occurs when there is an imperfection in some part of your cornea, the clear tissue that covers your iris. Light rays pass through the cornea as they travel to the retina, a thin layer of cells at the back of your

    Read more
  • What You Need to Know About Dry Eye

    If you have never suffered from dry eye, you might not appreciate how important your tears are to your eye health. Without enough moisture, your eyes can become dry, itchy, red and uncomfortable. Dry eye occurs when you do not make enough tears or the tears you produce are not high quality. The Importance

    Read more
  • The Science Behind Perfect Eyesight

    It's easy to take vision for granted when the eyes perform flawlessly. However, when eye problems crop up, it's hard not to wonder how the eyes work. In a properly functioning eye, a number of elements must cooperate perfectly to create good vision; just one malfunctioning factor in this instantaneous

    Read more
  • Preparing for Laser Eye Surgery

    Choosing laser eye surgery is a big decision. Whatever your treatment goal, proper preparation before surgery will help you obtain optimal results, speed up recovery, and minimize potential risks. If you've done your homework, then this advanced procedure can lead to a quick and healthy recovery. Here's

    Read more
  • Considering Laser Vision Correction

    Since the infancy of laser vision correction services in the 1980s, the field has made leaps and bounds in increasing the safety and efficacy of these procedures. Today, over 28 million LASIK surgery procedures have been performed worldwide, reports the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Furthermore,

    Read more
  • Keratoconus

    While keratoconus can happen at any stage of life, young people between the ages of 10 and 25 are most likely to develop this disorder. For individuals with keratoconus, their cornea, the clear layer in the front of your eye, gradually thins and begins to bulge outward. Keratoconus typically causes nearsightedness

    Read more
  • Hyperopia

    People with hyperopia, also known as farsightedness, can usually see objects in the distance, but their close vision is blurry. Symptoms of untreated hyperopia include: Difficulty concentrating on near work, such as reading Eye strain Headaches after reading or other activities involving close focus Aching,

    Read more
  • Collagen Crosslinking

    Collagen crosslinking (CXL) is a relatively new procedure used to treat patients with keratoconus. Keratoconus is a thinning of the corneas which causes them to form a cone shape and bulge outwards. Many countries outside the U.S. use CXL, but the procedure hasn’t yet received FDA approval. However,

    Read more
  • Astigmatism

    A normal cornea — the clear front covering of your eye — has a round curve, like a basketball. However, many people have an irregularly shaped cornea while others have an irregularly curved lens. Both cases can cause light that enters the eye to bend the wrong way, causing blurry vision. This disorder

    Read more
  • Types of Refractive Surgery

    There are several types of refractive surgery available to correct vision problems caused by refractive errors, including: LASIK (laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis) Custom or bladeless LASIK Photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) Laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) Epi-LASIK Conductive Keratoplasty

    Read more
  • PRK (ASA)

    When the cornea is misshapen, light bends (refracts) incorrectly, leading to vision problems. Refractive surgeries aim to reshape the cornea, thereby improving vision. LASIK is one of the most popular types of refractive surgeries. However, not everyone is an appropriate candidate for LASIK. Fortunately,

    Read more
  • Presbyopia

    Somewhere around the age of 40, most people’s eyes lose the ability to focus on close-up objects. This condition is called presbyopia. You may start holding reading material farther away, because it is blurry up close. Reading suddenly gives you eyestrain. You might wonder when manufacturers started

    Read more
  • Myopia

    Myopia, or nearsightedness, means that your eyes can see close objects clearly but struggle to see things in the distance. Nearly 30 percent of Americans are nearsighted. This condition usually develops in children and teenagers, up to about the age of 20. A teacher or parent might notice a child squinting

    Read more
  • LASIK

    Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis, or LASIK, is the most common type of refractive surgery. If the curvature of your cornea deviates from the ideal curvature, light entering your eye will bend (refract) incorrectly. This is known as a refractive error and can cause vision problems. For many patients,

    Read more
  • Laser Surgery to Treat Presbyopia (Monovision)

    Presbyopia is the gradual decline in close vision that occurs with age. The condition occurs as the lens in the eye stiffens and loses its flexibility, thereby impairing its ability to focus at images or objects up close. While multifocal prescription glasses, such as bifocals, are one possible treatment

    Read more

New Patients Receive 15% OFF Second Pair of Complete Glasses!

No form settings found. Please configure it.

Location

Office Hours

Monday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Tuesday:

8:00 am-7:00 pm

Wednesday:

8:00 am-5:00 PM

Thursday:

8:00 am-5:00 PM

Friday:

8:00 am-5:00 PM

Saturday:

Closed

Sunday:

Closed